Spotlight on...the students of Inside the Frame with Rebecca Conway

Awareness and intention are two of the most influential tools in framing an effective composition. Whether you are drawn to the visual and graphic nature of a scene or are an emotionally driven shooter, knowing how to arrange those elements is crucial in conveying your intended message to the viewer. My first run of the Inside The Frame here at Illuminate was wonderful, challenging and inspiring. Each week of the three-week class builds through daily lessons and offers exercises and weekly assignments to have students practicing each technique or concept. I was inspired while watching the students push and challenge themselves to put the new lessons to practice with a better understanding and fresh approach to the topics they were already familiar with.  
 

Not all assignments in the class were related to shooting new images, but exploring the value of studying your own imagery as a whole to develop more insight to your own innate way of seeing. Recognizing what draws you and drives you to frame a scene is the foundation for developing your eye for more dynamic composition. 

Conversation and question is key to gaining knowledge. The dialogue with the students and myself about lessons, along with the feedback on critiques I gave on assignments and exercises had them questioning their intent and evaluating their own images in ways they had been overlooking, unaware of, or possibly forgotten over the course of their journey of learning. So much insight was gained from not only their own personal critique, but reading and following the other questions and feedback in the class. 

A big thank you to the students of this class for challenging your mind and eye to see things in a new or different way. I am grateful for the chance to share and continue growing as a teacher. Can’t wait until my next class in a few months! 
xo, 
Rebecca Conway | Instructor of Inside the Frame

Spotlight on..the students of the Simple Edit with Leah Zawadzki

The Simple Edit is not about image processing as much as about the process itself, about the role post production plays in making photographs. This first class of students was amazing, eager to learn and so full of potential. In our two weeks together it was all about unraveling that potential, exploring it in their work and bringing it to life with their edits.

Beyond the mechanics of learning the Lightroom program, during the first week of class we took a look at student work by editing images. In this process, not only did they get a first-hand look at how Lightroom worked, but also gained insight on “seeing” edits and what we can learn from our images in post processing. Here are a few photographs from that exercise.

Growth occurs in the process of making choices about our work. The better we understand our own work and the direction we want to take it, the easier the choices become. From choosing color temperature to image contrast, to which photos to show in a session or in our portfolio’s or even with our personal work, making choices helps define us as artists. By shooting and editing and making more work, it’s in this process that we all have the opportunity to make better work. 

By the beginning of the second week students are asked to look at their own work and select 6-10 of their top images. These images begin to define the kind of work they want to make. It’s amazing how many of us have a hard time, for whatever reason, making these decisions. But once we push ourselves to make hard choices, the result begins to tell us not only about our work but about ourselves.  

Over the weekend, students are asked to make work using the process presented in class. Part of the exercise is about using Lightroom, so if questions arise, they do so during class. More importantly, it’s about making new work and to practice making choices in post-production. Here are a few images students submitted, and I was so impressed with the progress in just a little over a week.

It was so much fun to see the growth and discovery unfold before my eyes. By the time class was over I had fallen in love with my student’s hearts and each one’s desire to make meaningful work. It was such a pleasure!! xo

Leah Zawadzki | Instructor of the Simple Edit

Spotlight on....the students of Magic of Light with Summer Murdock

"I have been teaching the Magic of Light workshop going on four years now and every class I feel so incredibly honored and humbled that these talented photographers saw something in my work that made them want to spend their time with me in class. It is amazing to see significant growth in these artists in such a short amount of time. I was able to witness many "aha" moments. Nothing makes me happier than to see photographers begin to gain the tools and knowledge that will help them bring to life the images that have been previously stuck inside their heads. Or even seeing them begin to develop the confidence that they can walk into any lighting situation and know how to create the images they want with intention vs by "happy accident." I saw a lot of that during this last class. The Magic of Light workshop is more than just learning technique though, it's about slowing down and seeing all the beauty around us, being inspired by it, and then using your camera to capture it deliberately and with intent. It's about trusting in your own creative vision, no longer being a slave to your camera, and creating cool images in whatever light is available. All light is not equal but you really can create good images in any kind of light. It's also about having an open and safe space to learn and grow…

These are some of the images that the talented and inspiring photographers created during the last run of the workshop…"

Summer Murdock | Instructor of The Magic of Light

Yan Liu

Yan Liu

Becky Amshoff

Becky Amshoff

Sarah Pogorzelski

Sarah Pogorzelski

Rewind 2.0 with Jennifer Tonetti Spellman Giveaway

"3 years ago I wrote an article called Get Out of Your Own Way.  That article sparked an intense reaction from many photographers who felt it spoke directly to them, their fear of failure and what crippled them creatively.  The response was so moving I felt compelled to create a class called Rewind.  Rewind urged students to take the necessary time to work on themselves, to address insecurities and target what they needed to do to move forward on their personal creative path.  After amazing feedback from the community I revamped the class into Rewind 2.0 to reflect what former 'rewinders' wanted to see more of as they tackled their issues head on."

Jennifer Tonetti Spellman | Rewind 2.0

Embracing Your Inner Artist with Deb Schwedhelm Giveaway

"Recognizing and embracing the artistry in your photography is what will eventually separate your work from the work of other photographers – it is what will make your photographs special, compelling and uniquely yours. In this course, Embracing Your Inner Artist, students will will begin to explore the relationship with their individual creativity and artistry more deeply. Students will reflect and critically think about their photography and who they are as an artist."

Deb Schwedhelm | Embracing Your Inner Artist

Film-Making with Hailey Bartholomew Giveaway

 

 

"This course is for people who have had a bit of a play with filming. You have been experimenting with making short films and videos but want to take it to the next level. Maybe you want feedback on your films? You want to know how another film-maker makes it work - bringing a personal or commercial project together. You are ready to dive in a bit deeper and understand more about your settings and how to tell a story. If this is you, join in and come along!."

Hailey Bartholomew | Film-Making

Spotlight on...the students of The Family Historian with Heather Robinson

There is a popular saying, “A picture paints a thousand words.”  Isn’t this why so many people take photographs?  We need these mementos to help us remember the past.  Because without them we forget.  But the truth is even with them we forget.  This is because our brains aren’t capable of retrieving all the specifics that make up actual stories.  With the passing of time the story lines become twisted.  If the who, what, when, where, and why never get answered, what becomes of the story?  The answers can only come from those who lived the stories.  And if these answers never get recorded, the photograph is merely a piece of paper with some people’s images printed in ink. It is through the narratives that we attach to these pictures that our stories live on long after we are gone.  

In The Family Historian, I challenge my students to search their souls for what is most sacred to them and therefore must be preserved.  I encourage them to let down their guards and document their families with honesty.  

During the first week of class, I show the students how to capture what matters most in their family stories while using creative light and composition.  I believe that you can document your everyday authentically and artistically. 

Image by Francesca Russell  
Image by Kristin Wahls  

Image by Kristin Wahls  

Image by Sonja Stich

Image by Sonja Stich

In order to leave behind a rich, authentic family history, I encourage the students to capture not only the good but also the bad.  I was so proud of all of the students who allowed themselves to be vulnerable. They embraced the mess and chaos of raising children and captured it not only accurately but also beautifully.   

A major goal of mine when teaching this workshop is to not only embolden students to step into the frame with their families, but also to write themselves into the story by photographing themselves in real everyday moments with their children.  I want them to take self-portraits that show connection.  These photos might one day be all that our children have of us.  Shouldn’t they show them who we really were and how intensely we loved them?

Image by Renee Jansen

Image by Renee Jansen

Image by Jessica Gyoda  

Image by Jessica Gyoda  

The final assignment required the students to put everything they learned about light, composition, authenticity, and writing narratives together to document an important part of their family history.  This is when all those important questions get answered.  The narratives connect the dots.  They bolster the photographs.  Together they tell the stories that make up a family legacy.  

Perhaps there should be a new saying, “A picture inspires a thousand words.”  

“Look at you, Honeybear.  Holes in the knees of pants that have suddenly become an inch too short.  You look at me and whisper, "I'm so tired", and boy do I believe you.  Growing makes us ache.  You have started asking to hold my hand on our morning outings while baby sleeps.  You hand is still so tiny and soft and warm and it makes me remember when it was just you and me, Daddy too of course but mostly just us wandering the days away.  I miss that time with you.  When I was the witness of every wonder you had for the world.  When I didn't have to share you.  When you didn't have to share me.” Image and words by Kendra Knaggs  

“Look at you, Honeybear.  Holes in the knees of pants that have suddenly become an inch too short.  You look at me and whisper, "I'm so tired", and boy do I believe you.  Growing makes us ache.  You have started asking to hold my hand on our morning outings while baby sleeps.  You hand is still so tiny and soft and warm and it makes me remember when it was just you and me, Daddy too of course but mostly just us wandering the days away.  I miss that time with you.  When I was the witness of every wonder you had for the world.  When I didn't have to share you.  When you didn't have to share me.”

Image and words by Kendra Knaggs  

“Just another ordinary day. Up at the crack of dawn, eating your favorite breakfast-- peanut butter roll-ups (today they are in the "taco" shape) and b-meanas. You've called them b-meanas for as long as I can remember. My heart will be sad the day that they become, 'bananas'. Grace, you are flipping through a year's worth of pictures on your digital camera-- the camera that we bought you for your third birthday. You are getting more and more excited with each picture you find. I love flipping through your camera and seeing through your eyes. There are so many pictures of me. I once read somewhere that we photograph what we fear losing. Mine is you. I'm glad yours is me. Eloise, you were so mad at me this morning because I moved your chair. The two of you usually sit on the end of the table so that you aren't touching, but today your mama needed to play with the light. You keep asking Grace to show you the pictures, she does, and then takes a picture of the two of you together. I hope you are always together, side by side, thick as thieves.” Image and words by Jennifer Vidonish

“Just another ordinary day. Up at the crack of dawn, eating your favorite breakfast-- peanut butter roll-ups (today they are in the "taco" shape) and b-meanas. You've called them b-meanas for as long as I can remember. My heart will be sad the day that they become, 'bananas'. Grace, you are flipping through a year's worth of pictures on your digital camera-- the camera that we bought you for your third birthday. You are getting more and more excited with each picture you find. I love flipping through your camera and seeing through your eyes. There are so many pictures of me. I once read somewhere that we photograph what we fear losing. Mine is you. I'm glad yours is me. Eloise, you were so mad at me this morning because I moved your chair. The two of you usually sit on the end of the table so that you aren't touching, but today your mama needed to play with the light. You keep asking Grace to show you the pictures, she does, and then takes a picture of the two of you together. I hope you are always together, side by side, thick as thieves.”

Image and words by Jennifer Vidonish

“It has been approximately two-thousand-seven-hundred and 1 days (give or take a handful) since I have slept through the night. Pregnancy nights were filled with endless trips to the bathroom to pee, hip pain, hunger then nausea and inability to turn myself over without Dad’s gentle push to help my aching body. Newborn to 18 month nights were filled with round the clock feedings, blistered and bleeding nipples, the dreaded light-blanket at home jaundice care, kids up screaming just for no reason, and an anxious mind that questioned everything. Then until now nights have been filled with need for water, bedhead in the shadows and sleep filled eyes looking for a body to wrap yourselves around, labored breathing from the croup or plain old wakefulness. When I first got pregnant, I think a million people said to me, “Oh night time is my favorite. Enjoy it while you can. They won’t be little forever. This time goes by too fast.” Each time it was said to me I wanted to punch them in the face. But two-thousand-seven-hundred and 1 days (give or take a handful) later, I can see a glimmer of beauty in the night time work. There are faint shadows of moments moving through my mind of the joy instead of the pain. Hands on my tummy feeling you move, the warmth of your breath on my neck and the pressure of your tiny fingers wrapped around mine, the relief that comes over your body when I carry you back to bed after a bad dream, the sound of your sweet voice saying, “I love you too, mom.” Time can indeed heal and the gift of those memories is this kind of closeness with you.” Image and words by Rachel Wheeler  

“It has been approximately two-thousand-seven-hundred and 1 days (give or take a handful) since I have slept through the night. Pregnancy nights were filled with endless trips to the bathroom to pee, hip pain, hunger then nausea and inability to turn myself over without Dad’s gentle push to help my aching body. Newborn to 18 month nights were filled with round the clock feedings, blistered and bleeding nipples, the dreaded light-blanket at home jaundice care, kids up screaming just for no reason, and an anxious mind that questioned everything. Then until now nights have been filled with need for water, bedhead in the shadows and sleep filled eyes looking for a body to wrap yourselves around, labored breathing from the croup or plain old wakefulness.

When I first got pregnant, I think a million people said to me, “Oh night time is my favorite. Enjoy it while you can. They won’t be little forever. This time goes by too fast.” Each time it was said to me I wanted to punch them in the face.

But two-thousand-seven-hundred and 1 days (give or take a handful) later, I can see a glimmer of beauty in the night time work. There are faint shadows of moments moving through my mind of the joy instead of the pain. Hands on my tummy feeling you move, the warmth of your breath on my neck and the pressure of your tiny fingers wrapped around mine, the relief that comes over your body when I carry you back to bed after a bad dream, the sound of your sweet voice saying, “I love you too, mom.” Time can indeed heal and the gift of those memories is this kind of closeness with you.”

Image and words by Rachel Wheeler  

Over the course of two weeks, I quickly became enamored with the beautiful voices who came together to share their stories, their hopes and fears, and their hearts.  I look forward to keeping in touch with these students and hopefully getting peeks from time to time at the lovely stories that they are writing for themselves and those they love most.

XO,
Heather Robinson | Instructor of The Family Historian

Spotlight on...the students of Project Development & Fine Art with Deb Schwedhelm

Where do I start? What an incredible two weeks we had together and I was absolutely blown away by the dedication of these students and all that they accomplished. 

This was my first, but definitely not my last, Project Development & Fine Art course here at Illuminate. It was a jam-packed two weeks of information, sharing, learning and growing but the Illuminate platform made it so easy to follow along, discuss and ask questions. The students asked incredible questions, which sparked even deeper discussions on each day's topics. 

Towards the end of the course, the students were asked to share an assignment that they had been working on since day one, but remember it’s a two week course so they had started only 10 days prior. The series of images that the students produced inspired me on so many levels. Seriously, did I mention that I was blown away? I was! I offered each student honest and heartfelt feedback and critique -- but what impressed me so much was how dedicated they all were to working on the assignment. They were SERIOUS about this class, which made my heart so happy. So today, I want to feature a few of the students projects (but they really were all so good). Each student started working on a concept at the beginning of class and this was their resulting series, 10 days later...

Lauri Tripaldi | IMPRESSIONS OF SELF

Lauri TripaldiIMPRESSIONS OF SELF

Tricia Ramsay | FINDING HOPE

Tricia Ramsay | FINDING HOPE

Yasmeen Strang | THE TUB DIARIES

Yasmeen Strang | THE TUB DIARIES

Cindy Alvarez | RESCUE DOGS

Cindy Alvarez | RESCUE DOGS

Melissa Hogan  | THE CRACKS THAT LET LIGHT IN

Melissa Hogan  | THE CRACKS THAT LET LIGHT IN

I wanted to share a special note about Melissa and her workshop journey, which I am sharing with her permission. She emailed me on day two or three and said that she didn’t know if she could continue on, as it was just too much. We talked a bit about what was going on and strategies in moving forward. I told her that I knew she could do it, if her heart was in it. Well, she not only continued on, she did so fiercely and I couldn’t be more proud of her. Sometimes it just takes a little support and encouragement and I’m grateful that was there for her, to urge her on. 

I am absolutely honored to be able to teach, guide, share and inspire and I take my role as a teacher and mentor very seriously — each and every time. To all my students, thank you of entrusting me with your time, energy, hearts and minds; I am beyond grateful for the opportunity. I look forward to the next time!

xo,

Deb Schwedhelm | instructor of Project Development & Fine Art

Spotlight on... the students of Coming Home.

It's one thing to film documentary and lifestyle images in your own home, in a space where you feel comfortable, where you know the light inside and out and where the subjects are always readily around when an image presents itself. It's quite another thing however to walk into another person's home, not know the subjects as well, have to get familiar with the layout and light (fast) and capture that same unrehearsed, candid vibe.

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Inside the Frame with Rebecca Conway

Challenge your eye and mind to explore the fundamentals of arranging elements and their relationship to one another to create inspiring, dynamic compositions in your photographs. Inside The Frame will take a detailed look at many of the basic rules of composition to further your understanding of not only how, but why they work. You will be introduced to various techniques and creative concepts to discover new ways to improve visual interest and impact within your images. We all see the world differently and have our own story to tell. This class will give you the insight to observe, identify elements and frame each image with intent to convey your most compelling artistic vision.

Inside the Frame | Rebecca Conway

The Simple Edit with Leah Zawadzki

Where are you at with your own editing? Are you able to finish your photographs with edits that speak to your voice as an artist?  In this class we will explore this concept, along with the concept that it’s not always in the edit; it’s in the photographing itself. Sure you can use editing to fix some mistakes that may happen while photographing, but learning to understand how to edit can also help you begin to take better photographs. In this class, we'll look at ways to fix in-camera mistakes with editing, and at the same time, move you toward making better images all around.

The Simple Edit | Leah Zawadzki

Project Development + Fine Art Giveaway with Deb Schwedhelm

 

"Students will explore the process of developing a body of work and learn about the necessary skills to move into the world of fine art photography. Students will receive lessons on how to prepare and present a fine art portfolio, writing an artist statement, bio and curriculum vitae. Information regarding competitions, portfolio reviews and exhibiting will be discussed."

Deb Schwedhelm | Project Development + Fine Art

Birth Unveiled with Rebecca Coursey Giveaway

"This class was born not only out of my deep, unshakable love and awe I have for birth, but for my desire to create a space where we can safely explore what it means to attend birth as a photographer. In this class we will not only explore the documentary nature of birth photography, but about the art and science of birth itself. What is so moving about true documentary work, is that the photographer knows their subject. Just as the photographers Gordon Parks or Mary Ellen Mark were entwined with their subjects, we must also have a deep understanding of birth itself to make a lasting impact on our viewer. As a true documentary photographer, we hold the delicate balance of documenting, in real time, a woman's transformation into mother, as well as holding space for all who accompany her on her journey."

Rebecca Coursey | Birth Unveiled

The Family Historian with Heather Robinson Giveaway

"It is hard to let go, to slow down.  We live in a hectic world where we constantly zoom through our days.  We hurry our children too.  They resist as they try to live every moment to the fullest.  They linger in this happy state of wonder and joy that we call childhood.  This existence is momentary though.  Our physical time with them is minuscule, yet its effects are colossal.  You have the choice to quit skimming through this chapter of your life.  You can savor these moments before they slip away.  You can stop rushing them and instead take the time to soak up their elusive sweetness.  What’s more, you can take all of the sweetness, the wonder, the joy, and the magic that your children create and preserve it for a lifetime.  As a photographer and a parent, you have an amazing opportunity to create a legacy for your family.  No one knows the intricate details of your family’s story like you do.  With your camera, your words, and your love you can create the most precious gift for your family.  You can tell their story. "

Heather Robinson | The Family Historian

welcome to illuminate.

We are so glad you found us.

Our mission here at the school is to provide you with meaningful and practical knowledge than can truly inspire and make a difference in your art.  We aren't here to make you a carbon copy of anyone else, but rather provide content and tools to help you be your very best artistic self.

We've all had some sort of education, but oftentimes traditional schools miss the mark on what really matters. At Illuminate, we will focus on what’s important, what will really make a difference in your art and your business.

So to celebrate the launch of back to school this fall, we thought it would be cool to hear what our teachers had to say about the learning process by answering one question:

What is one thing that should be taught in school, but isn't?

© Hailey Bartholomew

"I wish I learnt about gratitude! Seems silly to say that… but it has been such a life changing practice for me. Learning to practice gratitude not only for life and all the beauty in it but also how to love and appreciate myself. This is something I have had to work hard to harness and do and would have been a great head start if I had already learnt it in school!"

Hailey Bartholomew

 

© Summer Murdock | Photographer

"I was one of those kids that excelled in school in my early years. I was told I was “smart” regularly. Then one day I started to struggle. I couldn't just show up in class and listen to the teacher talk though a concept once and ace the test. I had to actually study. I started to question my intelligence. Was I not “smart” because it wasn’t easy anymore? I wish someone would have told me that as long as I had an interest in something I could excel at it. Just because I wasn't good at it the first time I tried, doesn't mean I couldn't learn. The key is to focus on getting better at things you are actually passionate and interested in. When you do that suddenly learning is fun instead of painful. You stop feeling like you are always swimming upstream. Traditional education systems should teach us to focus on our strengths. Let us choose what we want to learn and quit trying to make us all so “well rounded”. The most successful people I know are not necessarily well rounded. They have hyper focused on learning something they really love instead of frying to improve their weaknesses. We can’t all be good at everything but we can all be really good at something." 

Summer Murdock

 

© Rebecca Coursey

I think about the school days I once had. Those days that are now nothing more than sound bytes of memory turned into garbled text of microfiche and song. But, they still sit with me. Those days. They are coiled into my blood, running like mercury through my veins; diluted but never dissolved. Those school days helped write who I was to become, as much as they undid who I could have been. I think about the school days that I once had. About the good and the bad. The heartbreak and the hope --the first kisses ---and first failures. That despite all its privileges, all the access and inroads it was supposed to lead young minds; it is often the things we don't learn in class, that propel our hearts forward even more:

That it was okay to love everything, love everything as hard as you could with all your might, and yet not be able to save anything. That the unlearning would be just as important as learning. That the dappled, early light that you watched spread across the frozen fields, in the dark of winter, on the way to school, would stay with you just as much as the words of a boy who was't afraid to hold your hand. That shame weighed heavier than guilt. That the ladder out was harder to climb than the ladder in. That the boy you loved at 16 wouldn't be the same man you would love at 26. That as a new mother, the 6 weeks would melt into 6 months, that would stretch into 6 years, and suddenly into 16.  That suddenly, you would be longing for their milky breath, as much as you would be longing for them to weather through the same heartbreak and loss you thought you could protect them from. And that still despite it all, there would be still be hope. And light. And love. And that you couldn't teach them everything in the short time they live with you. Even if you tried. And suddenly you are back to where you started. At school. At the beginning. At new corners. At inroads and exits. At all of the things you wish they had taught you when you were in school."

Rebecca Coursey

 

© Jennifer Tonetti Spellman

"The many definitions of success. Good grades doesn't make a successful person in all areas of life, just in one. It would be awesome for young people to know that success means different things to different people and that one size doesn't fit all. Also, that success isn't always what it seems. You can have a self made millionaire living in a huge home, completely miserable, or a working class hero living in a love filled home. Which one is 'richer' in life and more successful? Exactly."

 Jennifer Tonetti Spellman

 

© Leah Zawakzki

"It's not the stuff you learn in school that matters as much as learning to learn. I always thought that what they taught us would be with with me forever, but I've forgotten so many of the details I spent hours trying to remember. I wish someone would have told me this when I was young, so I’d have realized it was all for something more. That when you learn it’s a process and it's the work we do that grows and shapes us. The best teachers are the ones that know it's not about them, it happens in us."  

Leah Zawadzki

 

© Deb Schwerhelm

"Since I’m world / home schooling my kids right now and living in Japan, I’m not quite certain I know all that is currently being offered in the school systems but I have always wished that schools in America taught about important life skills. For example — money management (credit cards, loans, importance of saving, bank account management), home and car repairs, cooking, time management, people skills (manners, communicating, relationships), the process of finding a job, goal-setting, basic first aid, the meaning of success, the reality and positive aspects of failure, etcetera. While I know that these topics are also the responsibility of a child’s parents, I don’t feel that this information can ever be shared too much or that a child can be overly prepared in this department." 

Deb Schwedhelm

 

© Heather Robinson

"There is this thing that stands in the way of a student succeeding.  And that is self-confidence.  Without it, many fail to realize their potential.  I don’t know when exactly in childhood that this fear of failure begins.   But, the fear leads to a lack of confidence.  It causes a student to shrink in her chair hoping not to be picked on to answer a question.  It keeps that hand always down and never raised.  This fear has so much power over a student that it can cause one to question one’s ability.  Often times the correct answers are there.  The knowledge is there.  But without the confidence to share it, the student will never thrive.  In a heavily standardized learning environment, students must compare themselves to others.  This competitive climate kills one’s creativity and individualism.  I think that building a student’s confidence so that learning can be enjoyable rather than stressful is one of the greatest gifts a student can receive.  This gift can result in a life long passion for learning and personal growth."

Heather Robinson

 

© Rebecca Conway

"I think learning more about self-awareness could change the direction and shape the path for positive relationships and overall success throughout your life. I believe much of the understanding of emotional and mental wellness is the parents responsibility, and this can be an issue when there is negative behavior patterns or mental illness being set as an example for young minds. Your mind is the most critical tool in every aspect of your life. Having an outside source to learn more, deepen our understanding of our own thoughts and how to adapt and process them can lead to genuine inner peace, happiness and being your best you."

Rebecca Conway

 

What do you wish you were taught in school? We'd love you to add your voice to this discussion in the comments!